“Herbert I shall never forget these” (Dickens 502).


“Herbert received me with open arms, and I had never felt before, so blessedly, what it is to have a friend” realizes Pip, the protagonist of Great Expectations, as he sees his close friend, Herbert, for the first time in a while (Dickens 361). Charles Dickens, the author, takes readers on Pip’s journey to find meaning in life. Based on the actions of many characters such as Joe, Miss Havisham, and other couples, Pip discovers that love has more value than money. Joe Gargery, Pip’s brother-in-law, holds a strong bond with Pip, and helps him through life by apprenticing Pip at a young age and giving Pip the impression that Joe’s love is more important to him than becoming a gentleman by always being there for him. “‘Gargery is your master now'” exclaims the antagonist, Miss Havisham, after giving Pip what he needs to become Joe’s apprentice. Becoming Joe’s apprentice gives Pip a boost in life, and shows Joe’s love for him. Pip later realizes Joe’s love has more importance to him than becoming a gentleman. “There were days once, I know, that I did for a while forget; but I shall never forget these” (Dickens 502).  After apprenticing Pip, and never giving up on him, Pip realizes his happiness is worth more than his money. Miss Havisham, an old woman whose heart was broken on her wedding day, shows Pip through making him fall in love with a girl named Estella, and representing that hate should not live, that money is pointless compared to love. Miss Havisham “‘wants this boy Pip to go play'” at her house with Estella (Dickens 53). He visits the Satis House many times, over time falling in love with Estella. Later, Miss Havisham recognizes the selfish way she raises Estella. “‘What have I done!'” repeats Miss Havisham, realizing how cruel of a person she was to raise Estella only to break the hearts of men (Dickens 423). Miss Havisham’s love was taken away from her long ago, so she attempts to get revenge by breaking men’s hearts. She later dies in a fire, representing that hate should not live.Many of the couples in the book, such as Herbert and Clara and Joe and Biddy, are financially poor, but their love sustains them through happiness. “‘I think we are all engaged, except the baby.'” explains Herbert to Pip, letting him know Herbert would be in need to leave him (Dickens 266). Although Herbert doesn’t have much money, he takes time off to spend with his fiancé, Clara “‘It’s my wedding-day.’ cried Biddy, in a burst of happiness, ‘and I am married to Joe'” Biddy happily explains to Pip (Dickens 510). These couples may be financially poor, but their love for each other keeps them happy.Based on the actions of many characters such as Joe, Miss Havisham, and couples, it is evident that love has more intrinsic value than money. “I had never felt before, so blessedly, what it is to have a friend” realizes Pip (Dickens 361).

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